Insurance

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Insurance law has a long history across different legal systems and so requires highly specific skills to navigate its complexities. Nctm is recognized as being a leader in this sector offering services to both Italian and foreign insurers, re-insurers and others doing business in Italy. The Insurance and Reinsurance team specializations include:

  • policy wording & advice on innovative insurance and reinsurance products
  • advice on coverage and reporting
  • coverage litigation
  • claims handlings
  • subrogation actions and recovery
  • formation, incorporation and authorization
  • M&A and joint venture agreements
  • regulatory and compliance
  • risk management and risk assessment
  • relationships between insurers and brokers
  • multi-jurisdiction litigations
  • domestic and cross-border transfers of Insurance and Reinsurance businesses
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16/03/2017

The UK is nothing if not pragmatic. The pragmatism has sometime been referred to as perfidiousness: perfidious Albion. What is sure is that the UK will approach the divorce with the EU in a very pragmatic fashion. It will seek to develop bi-lateral relations with its direct trading partners. It will seek to revive the trade pre erences in the Commonwealth. It will seek independent influence in all international bodies.

Europe Must Go On 

The 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome sees the EU much changed from its early origins. We have moved from an economic community to a Union based on civil and human rights and the values common to the peoples of Europe. It has been, and is, a great success.

 

However it is clear that the Union is not without its troubles on this important anniversary. The Brexit negotiations are about to start. There are nationalist and decentralizing tendencies in many Member States and important elections in Germany and France. There are real problems of immigration and the absence of, or the uneven distribution of, economic growth.

 

These problems should not daunt us. Our fathers in the integration process faced greater problems. They sought to make peace and to make an institution to guarantee peace from the ashes of the most destructive of European wars.

 

What we must do is face up to our problems and resolve them. We have great shoulders to stand on. We have been given the evolving EU treaties, the Single Market, a strong Court of Justice in Luxembourg, good competition law, the rights of citizens, in other words a strong legal framework.

 

This is no time for faintheartedness. We must move on with courage and ensure that the Union is with us for more than another 60 years.

In this issue, we analyse a decision of the Italian Consiglio di Stato according to which the publication of applications for renewal of existing maritime port concessions in the EU Official Journal is not required. Any third party wishing to submit competing bids is however guaranteed by the possibility of preventively inquiring about the expiry of a concession as well as by the investigation conducted by the Port Authority (today Port System Authority), which must comply with the principle of selecting the tenderer offering the «best guarantees for a profitable use of the concession».

We then examine the differences in Italian law between a contract of carriage and a procurement contract for the supply of carriage services. It is important to properly classify the type of contract, and here we explain why.

Let us then examine two recent judgments of the Italian Regional Administrative Courts. The first one is on the possible ways of awarding a maritime concession. The second one relates to the applicability of the Italian Public Procurement Code to the management of intermodal freight terminals, the unavoidable consequences of which are summarised here.

In light of the forthcoming entry into force of the IMO Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments, we look at the impact it is expected to have on the shipping sector. One of the major problems is that, to date, there are no clear indications on how to make ships compliant with the new standards. Moreover, there are countries who have more stringent regulations than the IMO Convention. The risk is therefore to invest in equipment that can be deemed unsuitable at a later stage.

A recent ruling of the Italian Supreme Court allows us to briefly discuss the issue of non-payment of insurance premiums and consequent suspension of cover. The Supreme Court confirmed that insurance coverage applies if an insured event occurs within the «grace period», regardless of whether the next premium instalment is paid.

Concerning airports, the Italian Supreme Court opened the door to possibly finding liability on the part of ENAC (the Authority supervising airport activities and air transport in Italy) in case of airplane damage caused by poor maintenance of taxiways.

Finally, we conclude with our usual review of the news from the world of maritime and port labour. The most important news is about the renewal, in Italy, of the National Collective Bargaining Agreement for shipping agencies’ executives, which brought some improvement to the current situation.

We want to thank our colleagues at Nctm Brussels’s office for their contributions highlighting the most significant actions taken by EU institutions in the international shipping and trade sector.

You will also find a list of our events taking place at our Milan and Rome offices, in addition to the usual update on our firm’s activities over the past two months.

According to the Court of Cassation a concordato plan not describing in detail how it can be implemented is not feasible
The Court of Cassation (decision No. 4915 of 27 February 2017) lowered the threshold allowing the Bankruptcy Court to review the feasibility of the concordato preventivo proposal.

Does a concordato proposal need to assign all future earnings to the creditors ?
The Court of Florence (November 2, 2016) confirmed that the debtor can retain part of his assets, with a view to support the company’s recovery and in derogation to principles of liability of the debtor

Cram down pursuant to Art. 182-septies of the Italian Bankruptcy Law, if the agreement is more convenient for the bank than bankruptcy liquidation
A ruling of the Court of Padua of 31 December 2016 is compared with few other known Court decisions regarding the extension of the effects of a debt restructuring agreement to dissenting financial creditors

 

 

In this issue, we explore the new “Project Review” rule provided for by Article 202 of Italian Legislative Decree No. 50/2016, which allows the State to revoke funding previously granted for projects which – upon later and more in-depth review – are found no longer to meet the cost benefit ratio. What will the impact of this new rule be on port infrastructure projects in Italy? Are we at the beginning of a new era? We come back to the Italian port reform issue, this time to examine the ordinance power vested in the President of the Port System Authority. Analysing a judgment of the Regional Administrative Court of Liguria, we note how case law anticipated the reform when recognising the ordinance power of the President of the Port Authority even in the absence of an express statutory provision. We then deal with the need for prior review by the EU Commission of State funding projects involving upgrade works on EU ports. On 23 January 2017 the new EU Regulation on port governance was approved. We give a first insight on the main issues covered by the Regulation: financial transparency and the provision of port services. We examine the request to amend Directive 2009/13/EC, aimed at delivering better working conditions to seafarers in accordance with the amendments made in 2014 to the Maritime Labour Convention (MLC / 2014). We also provide some updates on maritime employment agencies. We then focus on a recent decision of the European Commission on State aid, which further helps improve the general understanding of the criteria to be met in order for State aid in port and airport matters to be deemed compatible with EU law. Finally, we draw our attention to an interesting decision of the Consiglio di Stato regarding the interruption of airport handling services, which is forbidden when deemed detrimental to the public interest in operation of scheduled air transport services.] We want to thank our colleagues at Nctm Brussels’s office for their contributions highlighting the most significant actions taken by EU institutions in the international shipping and trade sector. You will also find a list of our events taking place at our Milan and Rome offices, in addition to the usual update on our firm’s activities over the past two months.

As we settle into 2017 the drama of Brexit and Trump seem to have eased somewhat. While the drama might have lifted it doesn’t mean that the complexities that these two phenomena have introduced and are introducing into the practice of law have gone away. In fact, the more we reflect on what needs to be done to achieve Brexit the less clear the situation is. This week President Trump will outline what he means by the Wall and taxes on imports of goods. From a WTO law point of view it can only be disruptive and even destructive. The drama might have gone but the work is only beginning. In this issue we have a range of contributions covering how the Russian constitutional court has reacted to the European Court of Human Rights rulings in favour of the owners of Yukos, the OECD’s review of its own bribery rules, the EU’s new proposed ePrivacy Regulation, how the European Court of Auditors confirms our understanding of the responsibilities and obligations of Port Authorities in relation to concessionaires. We explain the new Italian Save the Banks decree and show how the EU Commission has a strong role in every step of the process and look at how the Commission proposes disciplining insurance distribution agents.

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