Litigation & Arbitration
As one of the major independent Italian firms, NCTM boasts a litigation department of over 70 professionals providing assistance to clients from a variety of sectors. The team recently handled numerous litigation cases relating to financial, tax and product liability issues.
Chambers Europe
The team is known for Recommended for in-depth knowledge of the banking sector, as well as an ability to handle complex mandates… “Well organised and co-ordinated efficiently”
Chambers Europe

Nctm’s litigation department is second to none among Italian law firms. Litigation counts for about 25% of the firm’s work and is central to the firm’ s culture.

Nctm has the resources to manage complex national and cross-border litigation in all areas of corporate law as well as litigation resulting from the spate of recent laws establishing remedies against companies.

Nctm provides assistance in the management of relationships in the pre-litigation phase, evaluating the “merits” of the dispute, as well as in ordinary and special judicial proceedings, national and international arbitration. Alternative Dispute Resolution with particular reference to settlement and mediation.

The main fields of activity of the department are:

  • corporate and commercial litigation, including those involving public companies and bodies established under specific rules
  • litigation involving banks and financial brokers
  • litigation in disputes related to tenders as well as to contracts

With reference to legal procedures, Nctm can provide legal assistance for the following :

  • property and personal damage claims, including product liability claims and recall campaigns
  • insurance related disputes
  • inheritance litigation
  • debt collection – consumer credit
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  • Newsletter
16/03/2017

The UK is nothing if not pragmatic. The pragmatism has sometime been referred to as perfidiousness: perfidious Albion. What is sure is that the UK will approach the divorce with the EU in a very pragmatic fashion. It will seek to develop bi-lateral relations with its direct trading partners. It will seek to revive the trade pre erences in the Commonwealth. It will seek independent influence in all international bodies.

In this issue, we explore the new “Project Review” rule provided for by Article 202 of Italian Legislative Decree No. 50/2016, which allows the State to revoke funding previously granted for projects which – upon later and more in-depth review – are found no longer to meet the cost benefit ratio. What will the impact of this new rule be on port infrastructure projects in Italy? Are we at the beginning of a new era? We come back to the Italian port reform issue, this time to examine the ordinance power vested in the President of the Port System Authority. Analysing a judgment of the Regional Administrative Court of Liguria, we note how case law anticipated the reform when recognising the ordinance power of the President of the Port Authority even in the absence of an express statutory provision. We then deal with the need for prior review by the EU Commission of State funding projects involving upgrade works on EU ports. On 23 January 2017 the new EU Regulation on port governance was approved. We give a first insight on the main issues covered by the Regulation: financial transparency and the provision of port services. We examine the request to amend Directive 2009/13/EC, aimed at delivering better working conditions to seafarers in accordance with the amendments made in 2014 to the Maritime Labour Convention (MLC / 2014). We also provide some updates on maritime employment agencies. We then focus on a recent decision of the European Commission on State aid, which further helps improve the general understanding of the criteria to be met in order for State aid in port and airport matters to be deemed compatible with EU law. Finally, we draw our attention to an interesting decision of the Consiglio di Stato regarding the interruption of airport handling services, which is forbidden when deemed detrimental to the public interest in operation of scheduled air transport services.] We want to thank our colleagues at Nctm Brussels’s office for their contributions highlighting the most significant actions taken by EU institutions in the international shipping and trade sector. You will also find a list of our events taking place at our Milan and Rome offices, in addition to the usual update on our firm’s activities over the past two months.

As we settle into 2017 the drama of Brexit and Trump seem to have eased somewhat. While the drama might have lifted it doesn’t mean that the complexities that these two phenomena have introduced and are introducing into the practice of law have gone away. In fact, the more we reflect on what needs to be done to achieve Brexit the less clear the situation is. This week President Trump will outline what he means by the Wall and taxes on imports of goods. From a WTO law point of view it can only be disruptive and even destructive. The drama might have gone but the work is only beginning. In this issue we have a range of contributions covering how the Russian constitutional court has reacted to the European Court of Human Rights rulings in favour of the owners of Yukos, the OECD’s review of its own bribery rules, the EU’s new proposed ePrivacy Regulation, how the European Court of Auditors confirms our understanding of the responsibilities and obligations of Port Authorities in relation to concessionaires. We explain the new Italian Save the Banks decree and show how the EU Commission has a strong role in every step of the process and look at how the Commission proposes disciplining insurance distribution agents.

Trade features significantly in this first edition of Across the EUniverse for the year 2017. It cannot be otherwise. US President Trump has said that he will change US trade policy building barriers to market access and forcing US companies to manufacture at home. China President Xi has said that China promotes barrier free trade so long as the barriers are in third countries (not in China). The EU is in the process of reforming its trade defence instruments and digesting how a post Brexit world will look.

 

This change in trade is evidence of wider change that is taking place around us and which is likely to continue into 2017. There will be federal elections in Germany and national elections in France. If Italy gets to change its electoral law there may well be an election in Italy. Will the forces that backed President Trump in the US win in the EU as well. The country most likely to change is the Netherlands, once a bastion of openness but now toying with the idea of giving the most votes to an anti-Islam party.

 

In this issue we look at the legal debate concerning an Italian exit from the Euro; a comparison between Trump and Xi approach on the concept of trade; some consequences of the excessive length of court proceeding; we also examine the advantages of the new italian “rent to buy” agreement; as well as the Multilateral Investment Court; an overview of the service sector; a further examination of the trade consequences of Brexit and finally the advantages or disadvantages of enhancing the bilateral framework between EU and US in the field of energy.

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